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PCH cardiologist shares lifesaving tech update.

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TLDR:

A new life-saving technology, the Impella Ventricular Support System, has been introduced at WVU Medicine Princeton Community Hospital. The system, inserted through the femoral artery, uses a small engine to pump blood from the left ventricle of the heart, providing support for individuals suffering from severe heart attacks or cardiogenic shock. Dr. Stephen Ward explains that while most heart issues can be treated with stents or balloon interventions, this device is necessary when those interventions are not enough. He encourages individuals to be aware of heart attack symptoms, including fatigue, lightheadedness, and severe chest pain, and advises against driving oneself to the hospital during an attack.

Key points:

  • The Impella Ventricular Support System has been introduced at WVU Medicine Princeton Community Hospital to assist individuals suffering from severe heart attacks.
  • The device, inserted through the femoral artery, uses a small engine to pump blood from the left ventricle of the heart.
  • Dr. Stephen Ward explains that the device can provide support for individuals in cardiogenic shock when stents or balloon interventions are not enough.
  • It is important for individuals to recognize the symptoms of a heart attack, including fatigue, lightheadedness, and severe chest pain.
  • Dr. Ward advises against driving oneself to the hospital during a heart attack and suggests calling an ambulance for better immediate care.

The Impella Ventricular Support System has been quietly introduced to WVU Medicine Princeton Community Hospital, offering a new life-saving technology for individuals suffering from severe heart attacks. Dr. Stephen Ward, a cardiologist at the hospital, explains that the technology has already helped save several lives since its introduction last year. The device is inserted through the femoral artery and uses a small engine to pump blood from the left ventricle of the heart, providing support for patients in cardiogenic shock. Dr. Ward explains that while most heart issues can be resolved with stents or balloon interventions to open clogged arteries, sometimes these interventions are not enough and the Impella device is necessary. The device can support patients through an intervention by taking up about 4/5 of a normal cardiac output. According to Dr. Ward, it is important for individuals to be aware of the symptoms of a heart attack, which include fatigue, lightheadedness, and severe chest pain. He emphasizes that if someone believes they are experiencing a heart attack, they should not try to drive themselves to the hospital. Instead, calling an ambulance can provide better immediate care, as they can relay EKG data to the hospital and administer medications. This new life-saving technology offers hope for individuals suffering from severe heart attacks and cardiogenic shock, providing support until they can recover their own blood pressure.

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